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M O D E L

MODEL   OF   NEUTRAL-INCLUSIVITY


C O N T E N T S


 
LIST OF PROSE POEMS
LIST OF FIGURES
PREFATORY NOTES


1.    BOOK   OF   INSTRUMENTS

  1. HAVING AND THINGNESS
    1. Having component parts, attributes and relations
      1. Having concrete and abstract things
      2. One relation of having-as-an-element
    2. The choice of ontological instrument
      1. Sensible and nonsensical questions of ontology
      2. On nominalism, phenomenalism and their antitheses
      3. Species essentialism on spec
      4. An instrumentalist attitude to ontology
    3. The attributive versus the objectual view
      1. Logical domains of discourse
      2. The characteristics of two different interpretations
      3. Second-order predicates on the objectual view
    4. Attributes as ultimate constituents
      1. Simplex and complex things in different domains
      2. Abstraction and concretion
      3. Concrete and abstract
    5. Wholes
      1. Their whole-, part- and pseudo-attributes
      2. Extensional mereology
      3. Having and part in a strict and in a loose sense
    6. Persons
      1. Speaking person-to-person
      2. The person as a pair of objects or object of a pair
      3. As something having both a body and mental properties
      4. The fourth of four lines of thought
    7. Existence and thingness
      1. The voidness of the metaphysical everything
      2. Pseudopredicates
      3. For an existence which makes sense
      4. The domain of a thing

  2. CATENAS OF ATTRIBUTES AND RELATIONS
    1. Beyond formal connectedness
      1. A matter of being heavy, equally heavy or lighter
      2. The concatenate predicates of a catena
      3. The catena and its predicates as secondary things
    2. Catenated and catenary predicates
      1. Catenated and noncatenated, primary predicates
      2. The tripartite structure of the catena
      3. Subdivisions of the catena's extensionality
    3. Other predicates from a catenical perspective
      1. Nondeterminative predicates
      2. Catenality and noncatenality
      3. Catenical aspects
      4. Antonymics and antonymical metaphysics
      5. The sense in which predicates are noncatenical
    4. Ways of classifying catenas
      1. The four main criterions of classification
      2. Explicit triads
      3. Quasi-duads: bipolarity and extremity catenas
      4. Quasi-hexaduads and quasi-monads
    5. The catena's position in a derivation system
      1. Basic or original catenas and difference catenas
      2. Other derivative catenas
      3. Factitious and nonfactitious derivations
    6. The scope of catenization
      1. The obscurities of a classical paradox
      2. Special and universal catenizations
      3. Where neutrality determines the mean
      4. Where the mean determines neutrality and moderateness

  3. ABOUT WHAT IS, CAN AND SHOULD BE
    1. Three times, three spheres
      1. To be in time or not to be in time
      2. The triadic sphericity of reality
      3. The realness of facts, modes and norms
      4. The sphere a thing really is in
    2. Nonpropositional and propositional reality
      1. A hierarchy of propositional levels
      2. Descriptive, speculative and normative thought
      3. The normativeness of 'purely descriptive' theorizing
    3. Propositional reality and language
      1. The interplay of thought and language
      2. Conceptual and evaluative meaning
    4. Language as means and as product
      1. The cultural norms of linguistic systems
      2. The values of linguistic systems
      3. The sex and age of traditional language
      4. Some deficiencies of traditional language
      5. Writing and speaking on new terms

  4. TRUTH
    1. Truth among others
    2. Theories of truth
      1. Definition and criterion
      2. Attempts to eliminate truth
      3. Carried beyond belief by the bearers of truth
    3. What should not be held true
      1. Knowledge and faith
      2. Some criterions for unjustifiable belief

  5. RELEVANCY
    1. The significance of relevancy
      1. Its width and depth
      2. The use of relevancy in ethics
      3. "Equal, unless ..."
      4. Relevancy or relatedness in other disciplines
    2. The diversity of the notions of relevancy
      1. Linguistic, logical and statistical notions
      2. Phenomenological and other notions
      3. The general structure underlying the diverse notions
    3. Conceptual status of relevancy
      1. Redundant?
      2. Formal or substantive?
      3. Objective or subjective?
      4. Factual-modal or normative?
      5. Wholly consequentialistic?
    4. Criterions of discriminational irrelevance
      1. Inconsistence as one of five criterions
      2. Fake focuses of relevancy
      3. Pseudofactual relevancy
      4. Dependence on internal or external nonrelevance
    5. Truth and relevance on principle
      1. Discriminational relevancy by analogy with truth
      2. In conversations and in information

  6. PARADIGMS OF DISCIPLINARY THOUGHT
    1. Disciplinary thought in general
      1. Its principles
      2. Four departments: science and ideology
      3. Four departments: philosophy and art
    2. Denominational thought
      1. Religion
      2. The theodemonist problem of proved wrongs
      3. The theodemonist problem of wrong proofs
      4. The role of normative supremeness
    3. Paradigms in science and denominationalism
      1. Science as a social phenomenon
      2. The analogy
      3. With certain qualifications

  7. ELEMENTS OF NORMATIVE PHILOSOPHY
    1. About saying what should be
      1. Ontological and epistemological preliminaries
      2. Objectivism versus subjectivism
      3. Monism versus pluralism
      4. Norms as interpreted principles
    2. The horizons of a triple-tiered profile
      1. Good, right and praiseworthy
      2. Performance, intention and motivation
    3. Sieving the values of the A- and C-horizons
      1. The matching and mismatching of value categories
      2. Naturalness
      3. Knowledge and intelligence
    4. Consequentialist theories
      1. In general; utilitarianism in particular
      2. Decision-theoretical consequentialism
    5. Nonconsequentialist theories
      1. Deontology`s duties and dilemmas
      2. Rule-deontology
      3. Both consequentialistic and deontological, or neither

  8. RIGHT-DUTY CONSTELLATIONS
    1. The basics of having a right
      1. Some traditional conceptions
      2. The correlativity of rights and duties
    2. Seven parties with their rights and duties
      1. A constructional classification of rights and duties
      2. The extrinsic right-duty constellation
      3. The general intrinsic right-duty constellation
      4. The special intrinsic right-duty constellation
    3. Some alleged rights and justifications
      1. Some traditional general justifications of rights
      2. Political and civil rights
      3. Social and economic rights
      4. State and citizen; parent and child
      5. Alleged counterrights
    4. Ways of losing or weakening rights
      1. The general nature of fundamental 'laws' and rights
      2. Concepts and terminology
      3. The extent and duration of the alienation of a right
    5. The right to personhood
      1. Existence of an extrinsic right-duty constellation
      2. What the right to personhood does and does not entail
      3. Alienating or overriding a right of personhood

  9. PROPERTY
    1. Conceptual analysis
      1. Introduction
      2. Having, possessing and owning
      3. Property as referring to a thing, relation or right
      4. Property as a legal, cultural or normative notion
    2. Traditional proper and improper arguments
      1. General aspects of justification
      2. For private property
      3. Against private property
      4. Proper and improper descriptions of what is owned
      5. Neither glorifying nor despising
    3. Things possessed and not possessed
      1. One's own body or its parts
      2. Other people or their bodies
      3. Land and natural resources
      4. The means of production and communication
      5. Money
    4. Property as a right of personhood
      1. The extrinsic ownership of people`s bodies
      2. An equal share in all other things not person-made
      3. The extrinsic ownership of person-made things
      4. The exclusivity and inclusivity of extrinsic property
    End of the Book of Instruments



2.    BOOK   OF   FUNDAMENTALS

  1. THE NORM OF INCLUSIVITY
    1. Basics
      1. Formula of the norm
      2. Why a non-metadoctrinal, nonpropositional principle?
      3. Why discriminational, nondoxastic relevance?
      4. Why taking the universal version?
      5. Why a catenically neutralistic interpretation?
      6. The norm informally
      7. 'The manager and the appearance of 'er workers'
    2. Discrimination and attitudinal consistency
      1. Condemnatory meanings of 'discrimination'
      2. Distinguishing nonrelevant distinctions
      3. The clustering of attitudes and practises
      4. Inclusivity as a criterion of attitudinal consistence
    3. Two principal attitudes
      1. The exclusive and the inclusive attitudes
      2. Can feelings about mixed scriptures be steady?
    4. Universal ideals and omnifarious failures
      1. Just a few examples
      2. Peace instead of war
      3. Democracy instead of dictatorship
      4. Equality instead of discrimination
      5. Tolerance instead of intolerance
      6. Being free instead of being unfree
      7. "... and at long last they realized how to proceed"

  2. THE MANIFESTATIONS OF EXCLUSIVISM
    1. How to survey a morass of irrelevance
      1. Holding on to a tree with distinctive ramifications
      2. Integral exclusivisms and the factor of distinction
      3. Dimensional manifestations
      4. Componential manifestations
      5. Operational manifestations
      6. The gravity of the distinction
    2. Exclusivistic but not subanthropic
      1. Sophistic
      2. Superanthropic
      3. Anthropic and ego-related
    3. Physical subanthropic
      1. Relative total
      2. Absolute total
      3. Partial-total
      4. Partial: laterality-based
      5. Sexual but not erotic
      6. Erotic: activity-based and relational
      7. Erotic: orientational
      8. Otherwise partial
    4. Basic nonphysical subanthropic
      1. Personative
      2. Nonpersonative
    5. Thought-related subanthropic
      1. Thought-related but not denominational
      2. Primacy- and principle-related
      3. Principalship-related

  3. THE NORM OF NEUTRALITY
    1. Basics
      1. Formula of the norm
      2. The principle of catenated neutrality
      3. Why a catenical principle?
      4. Why neutrality?
      5. Why a relevantist interpretation?
      6. Spatiotemporal neutrality and neutral-directedness
    2. Misassociations and nonneutralist attitudes
      1. The negativity-negatoriness misassociation
      2. The highness-catenary misassociation
      3. Extremism
      4. Protoneutralism and protorelevantism
    3. On neutral terms
      1. The morphemes of neutralism
      2. The values of neutralism
      3. The requirements of neutralism
    4. Well-being, happiness and beneficence
      1. The situation of a happiness-catenal
      2. The norm of well-being
      3. Happiness as (a) value or unhappiness as (a) disvalue
      4. The principle of beneficence
    5. Equality
      1. Forms of catenated equality
      2. The traditional principle of equality
      3. The norm of interpersonal equality
    6. Nanhonore
      1. Marks of honor exism
      2. The norm of nanhonore

  4. NEUTRAL-INCLUSIVITY, TRUTH AND PERSONHOOD
    1. Neutral-inclusivity
      1. The new model of harmony and unity
      2. The non-metadoctrinal principles of one doctrine
    2. Truth in a social perspective
      1. True statements, promises and threats
      2. Personal relationships and faithfulness
    3. Truth and neutral-inclusivity
      1. Truth and relevance in objectivity
      2. Truth and neutrality in expectations
      3. Realism before and after death
      4. Veridicalism instead of supernaturalism
    4. Personhood as one of four pillars
      1. From ananorm to Ananorm
      2. Freedom, extrinsic and intrinsic
      3. The freedom not to support polarity or exclusivity
      4. Freedom versus other values
      5. Property, extrinsic and intrinsic

  5. LIFE AND NONLIFE
    1. The inviability of an ultimate principle of life
      1. The meanings of life and death
      2. The so-called 'intrinsic value' or 'sanctity of life'
      3. The right to live on the immutable norms
    2. The lives of ecosystems and nonpersonal living beings
      1. The lives of ecosystems and living beings in general
      2. The lives of happiness-catenal beings
      3. The living bodies of potential and dead persons
    3. Causing, risking or allowing the death of others
      1. Killing other people or their bodies at their request
      2. Killing other people or their bodies against their will
      3. Risking the death of other people or their bodies
      4. Allowing the death of other people or their bodies
    4. Causing, risking or allowing one`s own death
      1. The reasons for choosing or risking death
      2. The meaning of life and death

  6. THE DOCTRINE OF NEUTRAL-INCLUSIVITY
    1. The DNI, the adherent and conflicting duties
      1. A synopsis
      2. Potential conflicts between duties
      3. Under the denomination of the Norm
    2. The DNI, the state and political ideologies
      1. Truth, nondiscrimination and the state
      2. Monarchism
      3. Politico-ideological exclusivism
    3. The DNI, the state and religious ideologies
      1. From religion-based to religious exclusivism
      2. Freedom of religion and religionism
      3. Denominational inclusivity instead of religionism
    4. The question of denominational primacy
      1. Some initial philosophizing on what comes first
      2. Normism instead of theocentrism
      3. The question tabled
    5. Postreligious, catenical normism
      1. Denominational and secular concerns
      2. Postreligious, post-theodemonistic and catenical
      3. A new denominational paradigm
    End of the Book of Fundamentals



3.    BOOK   OF   SYMBOLS

  1. THE REPRESENTATION OF NEUTRAL-INCLUSIVITY
    1. Instrumentalism, fundamentalism and symbolism
    2. The need and significance of symbols
      1. The presentative versus the representative
      2. Symbols and the mental or spiritual
    3. Ways of classifying symbols
      1. On the basis of medium, deductibility and function
      2. On the basis of acceptability

  2. THE CHOICE OF WORDS AND NAMES
    1. The use and nonuse of linguistic symbols
      1. Literal, metonymical and verbal symbolism
      2. The neutral-inclusivist's choice of linguistic symbols
    2. Speaking to or about sibs and other people
      1. Sibs and siblings
      2. Forms of address
    3. The n-a series of neutralist morphemes
      1. The two halves of linguistic symbolism reunited
      2. The choice of vowel(s) and consonant(s)
      3. Six morphemes, of which one ineffable

  3. THE SUPREME AND THE NANAIC
    1. The all-ananic
      1. The concept of (the) supreme being
      2. Its qualities, if catenal
      3. The question of its catenality
      4. The truth and relevancy of its existence
      5. Ananic instead of in(s)ane
    2. The all-nanaic
    3. Both together
      1. Two fundamental symbols
      2. Whether to address oneself to a principal being
      3. The dual character of the DNI's principal symbolism
      4. A comparison with theodemonist principal beings

  4. OBJECTS OF NONFUNDAMENTAL SYMBOLISM
    1. Neutralistic and compatible signs
      1. The Nanapolarity Catena
      2. Sign language symbolism
    2. Symbolism in art and design
      1. The new weltanschauung's impact on art and design
      2. The clothes of a neutral-inclusive model
      3. The neutral-inclusive model of a building

  5. DENOMINATIONAL OBSERVANCES
    1. Forms of action and nonaction, thought and nonthought
      1. The meaning of denominational observances
      2. Meditation
      3. Communion
      4. A funeral ceremony
    2. Special days of suprapersonal significance
      1. A quarternary, metric calendar
      2. The four Days of Neutrality
      3. The observance of the Days of Neutrality
    3. Social formulas of observance
      1. Belonging to an association and not belonging to one
      2. Formulas of symbolization and socialization
      3. As to the supreme and the nanaic
      4. As to the Days of Neutrality

  6. BUILDING ON THE ANABASIS
    1. The purpose of joining
    2. The neutral-inclusive movement
      1. Organizations and members
      2. The Promise of Adherence
    3. New centers
      1. Of denominational engagement
      2. Of research and education
    4. Ceaselessly
    End of the Book of Symbols



EPILOGUE


 
Note: the figures, letters and terminology used for subdividing the total Model are as follows:
I, F, S
1, etc
1.1, etc
1.1.1, etc
1.1.1.1, etc  

books (or BoI, BoF, BoS)
chapters
divisions
sections
paragraphs, prose poems or figures

served by a neutral-inclusive model
to understand the past, to interpret the present
and to build on for the future
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